About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CNNW 3
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 2
MSNBCW 2
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
now" with this fox news alert. just when you thought obamacare was the law of the land the supreme court has opened the door for a legal challenge. the liberty university, the religious institution founded by the late reverend dr. jerry fallwell has filed suit against obamacare and the supreme court says that suit has enough merit to be reheard by the fourth circuit court of appeals. essentially the liberty university folks are saying under religious freedom they should not have to live up to all the requirements under obamacare. the supreme court says that argument has merit. they kicked it down to the 4th circuit. depending what they decide, the supreme court could decide the same thing all over again based on rights of religious freedom. we'll continue to keep an eye on this. but a surprise and perhaps a momentous decision this morning from the u.s. supreme court. jenna: we'll con continue to watch that story a fox news alert. we're awaiting the outcome of a very pivotal meeting that could potentially ease the crisis in egypt or push that country into further chaos. that is one
above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, ambassador rice went on the sunday talk shows and said u.s. officials believed it was a spontaneous reaction to protest over an anti-islam video. not a preplanned terrorist attack. first the controversy was over wheth
and that quote the constitutional declarations, decisions and laws issued by the president are final and not subject to appeal. morsi insists the powers are only temporary and will expire when a new constitution is drafted. ed state department, which had just openly praised morsi responded delicately. saying the decree raises concerns and calls for all parties to work together. morsi's critics were less tame. protesters declared the revolution a jeopardy. and muhammed elbaradei said morsi. morsi usurped all state powers and appointed himself egypt's new pharaoh. a major blow to the revolution. >>> i want to talk about those consequences right after this. e? challenge the need for such heavy measures with olay. regenerist micro-sculpting serum for firmer skin in 5 days. pretty heavy lifting for such a lightweight. [ female announcer ] olay regenerist. for such a lightweight. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-
the revolution and a constitutional declaration and issues of laws are final and not subject to appeal. morsi insists the powers are temporary and will expire when a new constitution is drafted. the state department responded delicately saying it raises concerns and calling for all parties to work together to resolve their differences. protesters went to tahrir square. judges called for a nationwide strike. the winner of the nobel peace prize and important figure said morsi shed his nickname in favor of one familiar to most egyptians. powers appointed himself egypt's new farrow. a mayor blow that could have dire consequences. i want to talk about them after this. those are good things. upstairs, they will see fantasy. not fantasy... logistics. ups came in, analyzed our supply chain, inventory systems... ups? ups. not fantasy? who would have thought? i did. we did, bob. we did. got it. >>> we are talking about morsi, the leader of egypt, the first democratic elected leader who gave a somewhat stunning declaration this week. he gave himself nearly limited power. it's created uprising in tahrir
. geico, see how much you could save. >>> welcome back. florida's stand your ground law could be at the center of another murder case now. this time a murder suspect says he was threatened after he asked four african-american teenagers in an suv to turn down loud music at a jacksonville gas station. that they cursed him and flashed a shotgun as well. that's when his attorney says he decided to defend himself. police say 25-year-old michael dunn peppered the suv with eight or nine bullets. two of them hit 17-year-old jordan davis. there's a picture of him right there, killing him. martin savage is following developments from our headquarters in atlanta. what can you tell us about the story? >> good morning. the latest is michael dunn was arrested on saturday. he had his first court appearance on monday entering a plea of not guilty to the count of murder and attempted murder. and he's currently being held without bond. his attorney has been speaking out for him and he says that his client definitely felt that his life was threatened. first he says that he was threat upped verba
detail. >> what you make me proud as a former law professor of what a law professor can do. you have done tremendous things for the case of marriage equality. my question follows up on your notion of marriage pluralism. my former colleague says marriage is two things -- a standard form contract that establishes certain kinds of liberal basic rights but also a sanctification. constituting form. she argues in liberal state has no business sanctifying relationships and that will be ought to be doing is be establishing, dis-establishing marriages altogether. do you see that 20 years and now when you give this talk will not even use the word marriage? >> it depends a william e. my liberal. if you are a libertarian liberal, as the cato institute is, they would say yes. if you are more of the state should create conditions for human flourishing, the answer is not simple. here is what i will say more broadly. one of the easy mistakes of the whole debate is an over investment in lesbian and gay people on marriage and family lot generally. most people who are in relationships are in relationships b
money is that money, regulations -- that affected all the campaign fance laws. the citizens united decision was totally predictable as a response to mccain-fine gold. despite my working for john mccain, who had a campaign finance reform position i always thought was blazingly unconstitutional -- we have weakened the political parties and weaken the candidate committees. the political parties have been moderating influences in american politics -- the political parties goal is to assemble aajory, not to advance an ideology. the advancement of an ideology by either party is secondaryis a function of the majority. now, with all the super pac money there is incasingly ideological mey, increasing the enforcement money. reagan talked about the fact that if you are with me 80% of the time you are not my political opponent, you are my political ally. in a super p world where you have a apostate republican or an apostate democrats on an issue, you will see the enforcement of ideological discipline through the use of the super pac in a primary on either the left or the right. it has the fact
when you look at it on paper, a miles per hour that has not been changed. anything i decree is the law and the courts have no say. are the people going to take it? will they accept it? that is the question we will watch over the next few days. one more thing. it is important to remember egypt is the largest country in the region by population. it clearly has sway over the stability of the region. we have seen that recently in the conflict between hamas or the minutes and the israelis. is it your sense that things are teetering? the whole region seems to teeter with it. >>reporter: when you have such a large crowd in a square with tear gas and rocks being thrown it can be sparked off, bad things can happen, when a few people are killed. it can lead to worst things happening. the other side has shown some real restraint. we saw consolation of a protest movement by the muslim brotherhood today. if you get both sizes demonstrating, that is a recipe for disaster, the other side has held back. >>shepard: so far, steve. thank you very much. >> the important thing here is, remember, it is pres
, in other words, that they wouldn't be prosecuted under local laws like afghan laws. he doesn't feel that's going to be as big of a hurdle in afghanistan as it was in iraq. he says president hamid karzai is much stronger in his ability to say, we want u.s. troops here. he says one of the things that's going to be key is the afghans' demand for a lot of money in the later years, say, five, six, seven years out, how much money the afghans will want in return, wolf. >> because the president kept saying during the campaign, as you know, chris, that all u.s. troops would be out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. there's still about 70,000 u.s. troop there is right now. and most of them are presumably going to be there for the next two years or so, costing taxpayers roughly $1 billion a year to keep the troops there. would this be seen as a violation of the president's commitment to the american people to get all troops out of afghanistan by the end of 2014? >> reporter: well, it depends how you read the president's previous statements, wolf. it also depends on how things change in afghanistan.
of law. the agreement and the private market competition it launched help spur in the years that followed trillions of dollars in new investment, in infrastructure, in telecommunications around the world, and help spur a huge certainly unprecedented wave of worldwide telecommunication technology innovation, mobile and internet. global access to communications service rose in the years following that agreement, especially for mobile services in developing countries that took the opportunity to leapfrog past wired networks. between 2001-2011, mobile phone adoption increased globally from 15% to 86%, one decade. from roughly 900 million people around the world having basic mobile service to 6 billion, in a decade. now, the u.s. benefit from this global growth, u.s. export in information and communication technology services quadrupled over that decade. and as a global market continues to grow as we get those new metrics that i described, mobile broadband access went from one to 5 billion, the u.s. economy will continue to benefit. but given his history and the fortune seat as a junior staffe
to harvard law school and at the origin of one of his brothers immigrated out west to the illinois to clean up where the mining industry was in its heyday. he arrived after about a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, arrived in a steamboat in this muddy mining town, bordered himself and a log cabin, and slowly worked his way up and became a very successful lawyer and got involved politically, ran for congress, served eight terms and befriended abraham lincoln and ulysses s. grant and as they rose, washburn stayed with them as a colleague during the civil war and after grant was elected president initially appointed washburn secretary of state and washburn became very ill, after ten days he submitted his resignation to president grant show grant regretfully had his resignation and he regained his health which was always very fragile and grant the then offered him the position as minister of france, ambassador of france. >> michael hill on washburn, minister to france in the 1870 franco prussian war, and the only power of the state providing political and humanitarian support. q
that there is not a rule of law. and it is obviously the divisions are clear. >> we saw explosions literally not far from you, we saw you ducking, ben wedeman, arwa damon, sara sidner, they were pretty close to you. >> yeah, very close. we were standing in front of an open window like this and you could feel the shock waves, the blast waves through your body. >> really? >> the windows rattled, the building itself would shake. we're talking, you know, a block away, two or three or four or five blocks away. it's startling. ben wedeman is much made of sturdier stuff and i and was able to stand without ducking quite so much as i did. but it really brings home to you what it's like for gazans. >> you can only imagine the terror these people were feeling. >> oh, it was terrifying. and we were there for three nights. i was able to leave. they don't have any other place to go. >> when you got out you got out through a process through israel. >> yes, it's very laborious. >> it's very restricted. >> it is. you give him a passport, he writes it down in a spiral notebook, that's it, there's no stamp. you take a seri
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)